Type 1 Ultra

endurance sports in the weird and wonderful world of type 1 diabetes

Incredible Writing About The Type 1 Experience

Fear is a good thing. Fear of failure, fear of mediocrity, fear of consequences. A large element of living successfully with type 1 comes from beating fear – the fear that others, ignorant of what you’re capable of, project on to you, and your own fears about what might happen when you do things you haven’t done before. If we don’t beat this fear, then T1D wins and we lose. Spontaneity gets sucked out of life and imaginary barriers become reality.

But those are the nice fears, the fun and challenging fears, the fears that need to be laughed at, toyed with, and trampled.

The real fear is about the damage that comes when we lose our grip. Tight control is elusive, numbers go up and down. It’s sometimes a roller coaster, often a dance, and occasionally a steady flow. But everyone with type 1 thinks about the big stuff – kidney and eye damage that can come in the medium to long term. And we all know that type 1 consequences can claim lives in the night. And we all think it won’t happen to us. What are the odds?

But we need to remember that this is not just science but art, Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: Hypoactive, Type 1 diabetes, , , , , , ,

Don’t just run with type 1. Race!

Igor Stevic is a US-based type 1 who doesn’t just run ultramarathons, he runs them fast.

His blog is called Life is short… Running makes it seem longer… and as luck would have it, just as I’ve set up Type 1 Ultra on Facebook (please drop by) Igor has gone and run a smacking time at a 50-miler (80km) road race in the US and shared his post with us.

His approach to management on the run is quite different to my own (RH) as I pump and turn down, whereas he uses slow acting insulin and doesn’t reduce his dosage. The detail with which he talks about his management on the run gives a really good guide for anybody wanting to better understand his approach and perhaps consider what it might offer them, and whether they might modify it or copy it directly.

One final note to Australian and New Zealand type 1s reading race reports from the US. The glucose measurement system used by Americans is in a different unit to how we measure blood sugar, and the ratio is 18:1. If an American says that their blood sugar is 90, that is what we would refer to as 5.0. Otherwise Igor would be in a coma rather than perfectly controlled, so don’t get confused  🙂

To read about Igor’s run, please continue here

Filed under: Uncategorized, , , , , , ,

Confessions of a diabetic ultrarunner.

Every night when I go to bed, I make sure that there is some carb source beside the bed – a juice box, sports gel, halva, whatever. But I practise finding it in the dark, so that if everything goes out the window and I get the dreaded creeping night time low I’ll have half a chance of sorting it out.

I’ve just run my 2nd 100km event in two weeks. I’ve got a couple of niggles to work through with Physio and maybe yoga before next weekend’s road 100km. I might not make a personal best time goal, but I’ll get it done.

The thing though that plays on my mind is how erratic my blood sugars have been today. The day after a higher intensity long run is always a bit up and down. Travel is probably involved, which usually means long spells of sitting down, which means insulin not getting as active as it should, if at all. A lot of eating is DEFINITELY involved.

20131021-001201.jpg

But I’ve also just had to really dose extra to get sugars heading down from a high high before sleep. Is it bad tubing? We’ll, I’ve replaced that – always fun to stab yourself just one more time – just in case. Did I count carbs badly? I don’t think so. Has the insulin I used for an intramuscular injection ‘gone off’? Well, that’s hard to tell unless you have a lot of spare time to use it, wait, test, reuse, and retest. Am I just a lot less sensitive today? It would go against conventional wisdom to be significantly less sensitive after sport, but conventional wisdom also knows that type 1 can work in mysterious ways.

So?

So I watch my sugars finally respond to insulin and start coming down, so I can prevent longer term effects of the disorder and not wake up feeling sunburnt from the dehydration, as fluids from organs are redirected to dilute blood glucose levels that are way too high.

And I reach out to make sure I know where the juice box is so I can find it if I need it, when movement will be an act of will.

Filed under: exercise and type 1, run like you stole it, trail running, type 1 & ultramarathon, Type 1 diabetes, , , , , ,

Running 4 ultramarathons within 1 month with type 1 diabetes

Hi, this is Roger. The aim of Type1Ultra is to bring you a variety of information and news relating to type 1 diabetes in endurance sports and especially ultramarathon. Advertising is not the aim, and once I have a few tasks out of the way the aim will be to feature some of the other type 1s out there doing extreme things.

However, I’ve just put this clip together explaining what I am doing in the next month. Saying that you’re going to do something and actually getting it done are two very, very different things – so let’s see how this goes. Hoka OneOne has been an essential part of my running and this was cut together to feature on the Hoka OneOne blog. Sorry for corrupting the purity of cyberspace with any kind of commercial message, but if you can ignore the highly advanced subliminal marketing techniques, you’ll hear from a Type 1 who’s discovering the joy of launching himself into adventures whose outcomes are uncertain.

Filed under: exercise and type 1, Marathon running, run like you stole it, trail running, type 1 & ultramarathon, Type 1 diabetes, , ,