Type 1 Ultra

endurance sports in the weird and wonderful world of type 1 diabetes

100km to go to halfway: Octember’s first 100km race report

As you’d have seen from this post just over a week ago, I’m launching my diabetic self headlong into a serious challenge of personal endurance. In 20 minutes I’ll race out of the house to get a last bit of bodywork on my calves before the weekend. It seems that they are already copping the brunt of things, as I may have got a bit eager to hit a certain time goal 60km into last weekend’s 100km on the Hume and Hovell track near Wagga Wagga.

So, I have just posted my race report on the first of 4 running challenges for the month. 2 down, 2 to go, 1 still to write up, and 2 still to run.

Bring. It. On.

http://hokaoneoneaustralia.com/2013/10/25/still-100km-to-get-to-halfway-octember-pt-1-the-great-ocean-walk-100/

Filed under: exercise and type 1, Marathon running, run like you stole it, trail running, type 1 & ultramarathon, Type 1 diabetes, , , , ,

Confessions of a diabetic ultrarunner.

Every night when I go to bed, I make sure that there is some carb source beside the bed – a juice box, sports gel, halva, whatever. But I practise finding it in the dark, so that if everything goes out the window and I get the dreaded creeping night time low I’ll have half a chance of sorting it out.

I’ve just run my 2nd 100km event in two weeks. I’ve got a couple of niggles to work through with Physio and maybe yoga before next weekend’s road 100km. I might not make a personal best time goal, but I’ll get it done.

The thing though that plays on my mind is how erratic my blood sugars have been today. The day after a higher intensity long run is always a bit up and down. Travel is probably involved, which usually means long spells of sitting down, which means insulin not getting as active as it should, if at all. A lot of eating is DEFINITELY involved.

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But I’ve also just had to really dose extra to get sugars heading down from a high high before sleep. Is it bad tubing? We’ll, I’ve replaced that – always fun to stab yourself just one more time – just in case. Did I count carbs badly? I don’t think so. Has the insulin I used for an intramuscular injection ‘gone off’? Well, that’s hard to tell unless you have a lot of spare time to use it, wait, test, reuse, and retest. Am I just a lot less sensitive today? It would go against conventional wisdom to be significantly less sensitive after sport, but conventional wisdom also knows that type 1 can work in mysterious ways.

So?

So I watch my sugars finally respond to insulin and start coming down, so I can prevent longer term effects of the disorder and not wake up feeling sunburnt from the dehydration, as fluids from organs are redirected to dilute blood glucose levels that are way too high.

And I reach out to make sure I know where the juice box is so I can find it if I need it, when movement will be an act of will.

Filed under: exercise and type 1, run like you stole it, trail running, type 1 & ultramarathon, Type 1 diabetes, , , , , ,

Big Octember, the 474km Ultra Challenge begins

Hit the ground running yesterday, for the first 30km at least!

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Awesome scenery all day as we ran 100km from Apollo Bay to the Twelve Apostles. Such a lovely group of runners and supporters in action all day, it was hard to feel anything but grateful as we kept the ocean on our left and punched on along beaches, brutal staircases and switchbacks, rolling fast sections, and National Parks death traps. More on those later.

Here’s a tiny portion of my day at the Great Ocean Walk 100s.

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Filed under: exercise and type 1, Hypoactive, Marathon running, trail running, type 1 & ultramarathon, Type 1 diabetes, , , ,

Running 4 ultramarathons within 1 month with type 1 diabetes

Hi, this is Roger. The aim of Type1Ultra is to bring you a variety of information and news relating to type 1 diabetes in endurance sports and especially ultramarathon. Advertising is not the aim, and once I have a few tasks out of the way the aim will be to feature some of the other type 1s out there doing extreme things.

However, I’ve just put this clip together explaining what I am doing in the next month. Saying that you’re going to do something and actually getting it done are two very, very different things – so let’s see how this goes. Hoka OneOne has been an essential part of my running and this was cut together to feature on the Hoka OneOne blog. Sorry for corrupting the purity of cyberspace with any kind of commercial message, but if you can ignore the highly advanced subliminal marketing techniques, you’ll hear from a Type 1 who’s discovering the joy of launching himself into adventures whose outcomes are uncertain.

Filed under: exercise and type 1, Marathon running, run like you stole it, trail running, type 1 & ultramarathon, Type 1 diabetes, , ,

Woohoo! 210 session!

So we’re off. Fly to Melb, train to Bendigo, then run to Ballarat, 210km with 9kg packs by Sunday dinner. Write up to follow 🙂 Roger.

Filed under: exercise and type 1, trail running, Type 1 diabetes,

Big Red: Lessons from a Type 1 Runner

This is exceptionally clear and personal storytelling. If you’re someone who loves an adventure, loves a good yarn, or has any interest whatsoever in the most uplifting moments of the human condition, then you need to absorb Duncan Read’s tale. Like a 250km run in the desert, it’s substantial, undulating, and over too soon. His flattery made Jess and I blush and giggle but compliments from admirable characters you respect are always welcome. Thank you Duncan. Just like your endurance, persistence and courage, it seems your frank writing also deserves its own place in legend. Anybody with the slightest trace of imagination who reads your story must find inspiration from your reflections on your undertaking of the Big Red Run 2013. RH

A 250km race through the Simpson Desert
By Duncan Read

Big Red Runners in the Simpson Desert

Big Red Runners in the Simpson Desert

 I’m not an experienced ultra-marathon runner.  I’m a regular guy, with a regular job, a great wife and two kids.  I’ve always been sporty, and looked after my fitness. But I have type 1 diabetes. I’ve had it for 27 years, since I was 14.  I entered the Big Red Run, which is a 250km run over 6 days in the Simpson Desert, for a great adventure.  I also entered to prove that type 1 diabetes is not a barrier and does not set limits. On my adventure I found out that I was running for a whole lot more, and that it wasn’t about my legs.  This is my story.  This is a story about the second time type 1 diabetes changed my life. Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: 250km, Big Red Run, Born to Run Foundation, Duncan Read, exercise and type 1, Marathon running, Multiday desert running, trail running, type 1 & ultramarathon, Type 1 diabetes, , , , , , , , , ,